TREATMENT

  • Ear Treatment
  • Nose Treatment
  • Throat Treatment
  • Plastic Surgery

RHINOPLASTY

Rhinoplasty is a surgical procedure to improve the function (reconstructive surgery) and/or the appearance (cosmetic surgery) of a human nose. Rhinoplasty is also commonly called a "nose reshaping" or "nose job". Rhinoplasty can be performed to meet aesthetic goals or for reconstructive purposes to correct trauma, birth defects or breathing problems.

Rhinoplasty can be performed under a general anesthetic, sedation, or with local anesthetic. Initially, local anesthesia which is a mixture of lidocaine and epinephrine is injected to numb the area, and temporarily reduce vascularity. There are two possible approaches to the nose: closed approach and open approach. In closed rhinoplasty, incisions are made inside the nostrils. In open rhynoplasty, an additional inconspicuous incision is made across the columella, the bit of skin that separates the nostrils. The surgeon first separates the skin and soft tissues of the nose from the underlying structures. Reshapes the cartilage and bone, and then sutures the incisions closed. Some surgeons use a stent or packin inside the nose, followed by tape or stent on the outside.

The patient returns home after the surgery. Most surgeons recommend antibiotics, pain medications, and steroid medication after surgery. Most people choose to remain home for a week, although it is safe to be outdoors. If there are external sutures, they are usually removed 4 to 5 days after surgery. The external cast is removed at one week. If there are internal stents, they are usually removed at four days to two weeks. The periorbital bruising usually lasts two weeks. Due to wound healing, there is moderate shifting and settling of the nose over the first year.

In some cases, the surgeon may shape a small piece of the patient's own cartilage or bone, as a graft, to strengthen or change the shape of the nose. Usually the cartilage is harvested from the septum If there isn't enough septum cartilage, which can occur in revision rhinoplasty, cartilage can be harvested from the concha of the ear or the ribs. In the rare case where bone is required, it is harvested from the cranium, the hip, or the ribs. Sometimes a synthetic implant may be used to augment the bridge of the nose.

Although rhinoplasty is usually considered to be safe and successful, several complications can arise. Post operative bleeding is uncommon and often resolves without needing treatment. Infection is rare and can occasionally progress to an abscess that requires surgical drainage under general anesthetic. Adhesions, which are scars that form to bridge across the nasal cavity from the septum to the turbinates, are also rare but cause nasal obstruction to breathing and usually need to be cut away. A hole can be inadvertently made at the time of surgery in the septum, called a septal perforation. This can cause chronic nose bleeding, crusting, difficult breathing and whistling with breathing.